Debris from ceiling fell after denying existence of hell

 

His Holiness Pope Francis

With the world concerned with fake news these days I do not know what to believe anymore.

Take for instance the recent news about Pope Francis being quoted proclaiming that “there is no hell”.

This negation of the existence of hell by no less than the pope himself reportedly came from an interview by known atheist Eugenio Scalfari, 93, an Italian journalist who is the founder of Italy’s La Repubblica newspaper, which carried the news item.

According to Scalfari’s article published three days before Easter, he asked the Pope where “bad souls” go and where they are punished and the following was allegedly the pope’s sensational reply:

“Souls are not punished,” the Pope was quoted as saying in the Repubblica piece. “Those who repent obtain God’s forgiveness and go among the ranks of those who contemplate him, but those who do not repent and cannot be forgiven disappear. There is no hell – there is the disappearance of sinful souls.”

The Vatican, however, issued a statement after the comments spread like wildfire on social media, saying, the pope never granted the interview and the story was “the result of (the reporter’s) reconstruction,” not a “faithful transcription of the words of the Holy Father.”

Scalfari is known for not using tape recorders or taking notes during interviews.

But what makes this news intriguing is another sensational occurrence relative to it that has been reported, saying, that the Vatican has had to seal off part of St. Peter’s Basilica after chunks of plaster fell from the ceiling just hours after Pope Francis alleged to have proclaimed that ‘Hell’ does not exist.

The report said that bits of the ceiling rained down over worshippers near Michelangelo’s famed Pieta statue to the right of the main entrance, although no one was injured.

This is even harder to believe – I mean the matter of coincidence.

Although the Catholic Church doctrine affirms the existence of hell, one can’t really help sometimes asking ourselves if, indeed, there is truth about the existence of hell.

This is especially true in my case because when I was in my early teens I happened to know an old, religious lady, who, upon knowing that I speak Spanish, made it a point to converse with me in the Castilian language, a language she has been longing to speak, I presumed.

Anyway, among the many subjects we talked about in the many months that I knew her, we touched on the topic of heaven and hell.

I will never forget and will always treasure her wise interpretation of heaven and hell. She told me that if one lives a happy, fulfilling life on earth, that one is in heaven already, but if one lives a problematic, miserable life on earth, then you are in hell.

Life is how you make it.

Being endowed with free will, man has only to contend with this simple understanding.

 

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Duterte alluded to in Tagle’s sermon

Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle

I do not know how else to interpret it, but I think when Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle delivered his sermon on Palm Sunday, March 25th, about “arrogant and violent kings” he must have had in mind President Rodrigo Duterte.

“In our world today, we have many kings who are full of arrogance, bereft of humility. Today, many follow the kings who use violence, arms, and intimidation, so devoid of understanding and solidarity with the weak,” the archbishop stressed.

“Our king does not trust in violence, weapons, bullets and guns. Our king trust in God,” he added.

Chief Presidential Legal Counsel Salvador Panelo may have just been acting civil towards Tagle when he said he believed the cardinal was not referring to Duterte, as one of those “arrogant and violent kings”, but to other world leaders.

What kings and why should we be talking about other world leaders when we have our very own, in the person of Duterte, who has been demonized by no less than the hierarchy of the Catholic Church, the human rights advocates and the holier-than-thou members of the political opposition for his bloody war on drugs and the much ballyhooed extra-judicial killings, which allegedly has the president’s blessing?

We all have heard how Tagle speaks and when he makes his homilies, like that on Palm Sunday, he does it theatrically because he wants to create an impact so people would wonder what the allegory is all about and how it is affecting the nation.

But for those of us who have been following the political events in our country all these years, we also know that Duterte has been the overwhelming choice of majority of Filipinos to lead us and make a difference after years and years of ineffective and failed leadership.

As president, Duterte has not been acting arrogantly and violently, but his unconventional or non-traditional style of leadership, coupled with his intestinal fortitude to implement political will without fear and favor, not to mention his use of colorful language, has always been interpreted as his knack for arrogance and violence.

How wrong Tagle and his cohorts in the church hierarchy can be.

Duterte knows whereof he speaks about the problems of the country and the wherewithal of his actions and he continues to have the support and trust of the majority of the Filipino people.

Duterte is not acting like king and he very well knows his God.

In fact Duterte’s Holy Week message urging Filipinos to revitalize their faith and renew their relationship with God and fellow countrymen by rekindling their religious fervor and cherish their time-honored traditions as a pious people is something that the leaders of the country’s Catholic Church should reflect on at the man they think is the embodiment of evil.

 

The worthless Aung San Suu Kyi

 

Aung San Suu Kyi

I have written already a few pejorative articles about the ‘once upon a time human-rights icon’ and Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, especially in the light of the unceasing brutal killings and displacement of the Rohingyas, a Muslim minority group from Myanmar’s northern Rakhine state, and I will not stop disparaging and letting the world know how worthless she is as a leader in her own country.

While the whole world knows what is happening to this massive, senseless human tragedy happening in Myanmar (formerly Burma), yet this two-faced winner of the prestigious Nobel peace prize continues to negate the bestiality committed by her own government against these hapless people and has the gall instead to call these reports as fake news.

This time my way of discrediting Suu Kyi is by sharing with you this seemingly insulting article by Huffpost which is short of telling her that she is a bogus leader and winner of the Nobel prize and does not, therefore, deserve the admiration and honor bestowed on her.

Be more informed about this pretentious woman.

Please click at this website: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/us-holocaust-museum-aung-san-suu-kyi_us_5aa022f4e4b0d4f5b66cd500.

Hallmarks of ethnic cleansing of Rohingya Muslims

 

The exodus of the Rohingya Muslims to Bangladesh (AP Photo/A.M. Ahad)

You can consider this as still a sequel to the couple of blogs I wrote about the apathetic Aung San Suu Kyi which can be read at the following links:

https://quierosaber.wordpress.com/2017/10/03/aung-san-suu-kyi-a-laureate-she-is-not/ https://quierosaber.wordpress.com/2017/10/05/aung-san-suu-kyi-a-laureate-she-is-not-part-ii/.

The title I am using is actually part of the descriptive statement issued by US Senator Jeff Merkly about the crisis in the Rakhine State, during his delegation’s visit to Myanmar, when he said: “Many refugees have suffered direct attacks including loved ones, children and husbands being killed in front of them, wives and daughters being raped, burns and other horrific injuries. This has all the hallmarks of ethnic cleansing,”

More than 600,000 Rohingya Muslims have left Myanmar’s Rakhine State since August 25, after insurgents attacked security forces and prompted a brutal military crackdown that has been described as ethnic cleansing.

Myanmar’s de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s deafening silence and indifference to the plight of the Rohingyas caused uproar in the international community, especially that she is a recipient of the prestigious Nobel peace prize. Not only that. She herself suffered house arrest for many years and, thus, she would have clearly understood what injustice and persecution is all about.

Yet, her government has repeatedly rejected claims that atrocities, including rape and extrajudicial killings, are occurring in northern Rakhine, the epicenter of the violence that the United Nations has qualified as “textbook ethnic cleansing.”

It seems that Myanmar and Suu Kyi, for that matter, does not recognize the Rohingya and denies them citizenship, referring to them as “Bengali” to imply origins in Bangladesh, the country where the hapless people were escaping to.

“In the case of the Rohingya this is so severe that it amounts to a widespread and systemic attack on a civilian population, which is clearly linked to their ethnic (or racial) identity, and therefore legally constitutes apartheid, a crime against humanity under international law,” rights group Amnesty International (AI) said.

But China’s recognized power in Asia is the saving grace for the Rohingyas.

China’s entry and proposal for a three-phase plan for resolving the Rohingya crisis, starting with a ceasefire, has won the support of Myanmar and Bangladesh. A ceasefire should be followed by bilateral dialogue to find an immediate workable solution of the crisis and the third and final phase should be to work toward a long-term solution.

It is in this light that Suu Kyi expressed hope for reaching an agreement with Bangladesh on the return of Rohingya Muslims who have fled to Bangladesh in the past three months. She said both Myanmar and Bangladesh are working on a memorandum of understanding for the “safe and voluntary return” for those who fled.

“Nothing can be done overnight, but we believe that we will be able to make steady progress,” Suu Kyi said.

True, but the compelling question Suu Kyi has to answer first is: Do people, no matter how lowly they are in both social and religious stature in your country, deserve to die first before they become part and parcel of your community?

 

Sad state of the Catholic Church in the country

 

I saw this article in SunStar Cebu, dated, April 20, 2017, under the New Sense opinion column of Atty. Pachico Seares and I found it a good and factual read worthy to be shared.

It practically explains why many, like myself opt to go to church any other day except Sundays to be in silence and in solitude with God.

Home could be my church, too, where I find my communion with God so peaceful, uplifting and fulfilling, sans dumb lectures by priests.

One cannot help it, but some situation and events happen in your daily life that simply assures you that what you are doing is the most sensible and compelling thing to do.

And the beauty of it all is that there is no feeling of regret and discomfort about what you are doing.

Hope you can relate to what I am saying and what the article is trying to say.

It is the truth and the reality of the sad state of the Catholic Church in the country today.

Thankfully, God is everywhere.

 

Sermons drive Catholics away?

CATHOLICS have the lowest church attendance in weekly mass or service among religious groups in the Philippines: only 41% Catholics, compared to 90% Iglesia ni Cristo, 81% Muslims, and 71% other Christians. Social Weather Stations, whose survey was conducted last March 25-28, found a 48% over-all attendance.

The 2017 record is still embarrassing for Catholics although four years ago SWS reported an even lower figure: 37%. Then, as now, the Catholic Church trailed other religious groups on attendance.

Preached, scolded

Fr. Joel Tabor, SJ, president of Ateneo de Davao, writing in a 2013 blog heaped a lot of blame on homilies: “corny homilies that ramble in inanities that begin and never end and they never end because they should’ve never been begun.”

Churchgoers, Fr. Tabor said, are tired of being “preached to as if they were younger than adolescents.” People are tired, he said, of arbitrary claims to absolute truth “when the thinking world would continue to seek the truth”–and of being scolded and dictated upon.

On brevity: the church has reportedly adopted a time limit to keep churchgoers awake and in focus as well as meet schedules of succeeding masses, more so in urban areas.

Content, tone

But obviously it’s not just length but content and tone. Many homilies keep hammering on faith and doctrine to which the listeners can’t relate, the sermon not being tied to a current subject to make it relevant and useful.

Lingayen-Dagupan archbishop emeritus Oscar Cruz, in a media interview, said there are now many causes of distraction. Msgr. Esteban Binghay, on “Frankahay Ta” (dyCM radio, with Atty. Frank Malilong), agreed, a diversion that Binghay said also afflicts priests (mentioning, for the clergy, “FaceBook, mahjong and “tigbakay”).

Those compete with church activities. But why the heavier toll on Catholics? Why do members of other church groups still, ah, religiously attend the required function?

‘Discipline’

Shorter, more enlightening and interesting homilies must help but a major factor is “discipline.”

Catholics are not punished by the church for not showing up at mass (no one checks attendance and threat of hell and damnation must not work anymore), or not paying tithes (no one records what each puts into the collection net). Parishioners are not compelled to attend mass just as they are not forced by their priest or bishop to vote for or against candidates in elections.

See you in church Sunday. If nothing else comes up.

Tatad chastising Duterte over ME visit is idiotic


Former senator Francisco “Kit” Tatad and President Rodrigo Duterte.

I do not know why a washout and a loser like former senator Francisco “Kit” Tatad still has to open his mouth and say something critical of President Rodrigo Duterte’s visit to the Middle East (ME) when nobody anymore gives a damn about what he thinks and says.

If Tatad thinks his being a member of the conservative Catholic group Opus Dei gives him the moral ascendancy to be listened to, he is so fucking wrong.

Tatad who until now, no doubt, has that delusion of grandeur for having served the dictator Marcos and became prominent when he announced the declaration of Martial Law on Sept. 23, 1972, should just write about something else because every time he badmouths Duterte he is taken for an idiot.

Now why would Tatad say that Duterte committed “nothing less than an act of disrespect” by traveling to Muslim countries on official visits during Holy Week?

Why, would that make Duterte less of a Christian and less of a leader if he goes on a state visit at a time when Filipinos observe the traditional Holy Week?

“I cannot imagine any of his hosts—Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz al Saud, Bahrain King Hamad bin Isa al Khalifa, or Qatari Emir Tanim bin Hamad al Thani—making a pilgrimage to a non-Islamic place during Ramadan while the Muslim world is doing its month-long religious fast,” Tatad said.

What an absurd and idiotic comparison!

Yes, Duterte may have embarked on a long journey to the ME, specifically to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the Kingdom of Bahrain and Qatar, but it is a noble mission for the Philippines and the Filipinos, especially those working and having work-related problems with their employers in these countries.

That Duterte timed his visit during the Holy Week is not being rude and irreverent, but he probably did it to fully make use of his time and be productive in earning goodwill with these countries instead of being idle for the whole week when public offices are closed.

Could Tatad not see it this way?

Tatad’s bashing of Duterte would have been justified had the latter went on a leisure trip, but for a working trip, couldn’t the former Marcos sycophant at least give credit to Duterte’s well-meaning government mission to the ME?

But then again there is not even an iota of comparison between Duterte and Tatad.

Tatad’s noise is simply to satisfy a strong craving of attention for a ‘has been’.

That is all there is to it.

Better for CBCP to urge faithful to pray

Archbishop Socrates Villegas

Archbishop Socrates Villegas

Anytime the Catholic Church, through the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP), comes out with pronouncements, either in the form of a homily or a pastoral letter, strongly criticizing state matters it always frustrate many people, including myself.

Lately, CBCP president Lingayen-Dagupan Archbishop Socrates Villegas released a pastoral letter once again blasting the Duterte administration’s war on drugs and the resultant extrajudicial killings happening during the campaign.

Villegas seemed to be bothered by the fact that despite the violence and excessive killings, most people have been reacting indifferently to it and rather feeling oblivious at the terror they are witnessing.

Thus, the pastoral letter was written and sent out to all churches so that every Tom, Dick and Harry of the cloth shall make it their responsibility to remind their respective parishioners to get involve and be more vocal against the extrajudicial killings happening almost every day that are being attributed to the police.

Villegas implied in his pastoral letter that if the members of the Catholic faith continue to act like the three wise monkeys that embodied the proverbial principle, “see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil”, then they are just as guilty as those perpetrating the crime.

This is what bugs me and frustrates me because I think the CBCP is over-dramatizing the situation and playing to the sentiments of the people who, otherwise, are thankful that the drug menace, criminality and corruption are finally being addressed seriously and imperatively by a strong-willed president who has the political courage and the moral ascendancy to move this country forward and improve the quality of life of every Filipino.

I have said this before, and I am going to say it again: Let the political system run the state and the clerical or religious functions run the church. Let no one meddle in somebody else realm. Each is governed by its own laws and power and it is simply imprudent and discordant to encourage and advocate the members of their respective realms to go against one another.

I understand that the people belonging to the church and state are all citizens of this country and as such have the same rights and privileges under the constitution. Individually, each can voice out his or her opinion.

But it is totally different when we talk about the church and state as entities.

The state is about governance of the country and its people.

The church is about governance of the soul of people, which can be made better by prayers and other religious/spiritual activities.

That is how distinctly separate they are.